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Johanna Lang never named the father, and it appears that Anton himself did not know his identity–a theme repeated almost by chance in Fritz Lang’s 1955 film Moonfleet, in which a wistful boy searches for his mother’s long-lost “friend,” while never quite realizing that the gentleman-smuggler watching over him is his wayward father. People familiar with the director’s work will recognize the illicit love affair, illegitimacy, and the “doubling” of identity as recurrent plot situations that would become almost obsessional in his films. Lang liked to glamorize his own illegitimate family history right down to the happy ending in which an “honest man” comes to the rescue as father to the child.
Obviously a resourceful figure, Johanna Lang did set out to marry and legitimize her child. According to Dr. Friedrich Steinbach, a cousin of Lang’s who visited the family at intervals as a young boy in the early 1900s, Johanna Lang’s first marriage was to a member of the Endl family associated with the building firm. He may have been the “honest man” referred to by Lang; he may even have been the young man who impregnated Johanna Lang. One thing is certain: he did not give his name to the child.
Nor is there any documented proof of a Lang-Endl marriage. Yet Steinbach insisted on this point in an interview, as he equally insisted that Anton Lang did not like or respect his first “stepfather”–a pattern destined to be repeated by his own son. The first marriage ended in Endl’s death when Anton Lang was still a youth, according to Steinbach, and Johanna set out to marry a second time. The second marriage, Johanna Lang’s only documented marriage, was to a schoolteacher named Karl Schott, from the Alsergrund, or Ninth District, of Vienna. This occurred when Anton Lang was already sixteen, in 1876.
It can be hypothesized, from these tangled circumstances, that when Johanna Lang’s first husband, an Endl, died, she inherited a partnership in Endl and Honus. Perhaps she withheld her claim during the lifetime of Adolf Endl; or, necessarily, until Anton came of age. Upon Adolf Endl’s death, the mother of Anton Lang signed that inheritance over to her only child, in exchange for which Anton Lang agreed to pay her a periodic stipend for living expenses.
Anton never became an Endl or Schott in any case, and Johanna Lang conferred her own surname on the child. The “Lang,” therefore, comes directly from Fritz Lang’s paternal grandmother–her name and Catholicism being the first strong, lasting imprints on his identity.
Mothers are evanescent in Fritz Lang films; fathers, on the other hand, command an inordinate presence. Metropolis, early in the director’s career, depicted a dictatorial overlord who fostered rebellion in his workers and alienation in his own son; a wise and courageous professor is a heroic father in Hangmen Also Die; later comes the anti-heroic swashbuckler of Moonfleet. When it came to father figures in his oeuvre, Lang swung from pitiless characterization to idealized sentiment, reflecting his own inability on some subconscious level to come to satisfactory terms with his own father, the “architect” Anton Lang.
In real life, Lang’s father was commercially astute and fantastically hardworking, and under his aegis the construction business flourished. A tall man, the elder Lang was always impeccably dressed, usually sporting a mustache or goatee. He was aloof and strict with his children, however, and showed little interest in anything other than his work–certainly not in art or politics. Growing up, the more aesthetically minded son grew to disapprove of his father, for whom money was all-important. The disapproval grew into rebellion, settled into a cold-hearted dislike.
Fritz Lang’s mind was made up on the subject of his father for a long time. It is ironic that his father’s elusive connection to Honus and Endl provided the son with a solid footing in the world, considering that, later in life, the director made a point of discouraging anyone with family ties from trying to use him to get on the inside track in motion pictures. It is especially interesting considering the scorn the director heaped on the producers with powerful relatives whom he encountered in both Berlin and Hollywood.
Lang, owing in large part to his hostility to Anton Lang, was left without much feeling for family. And because of his father’s apparent illegitimacy, he could easily discount Anton’s influence while emphasizing, in loving tones, the roles of his mother and grandmother. These were the only two family members whom Lang professed to adore.
Toward the close of his richly eventful life, however, when Lang’s brooding grew morose, he had to admit that there must have been something good, strong, and capable in Anton Lang, for things to have turned out so well for his son.
Children, education, and religion were a mother’s business. Lang’s mother, Paula Schlesinger Lang, was the woman who nurtured and shaped the boy. Conversing with friends, Lang always placed his mother on a pedestal. The undying reverence he felt for her colored his attitude toward the women in his private life–they could never mother him enough–as well as toward the actresses and female characters who populated his films.

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